Winning a Leica M9 Monochrom & $20K!

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I did a crazy thing today and spent a measely $20 dollars on an incredible black and white photo contest in the hopes of winning an $8,000 dollar Leica M9 Monochrome and $20,000 in cash. This was a good deal. Mind you, this is the first time I have ever entered a photo contest of any sort, The fact that I love Leica so much is what pushed me over the edge. If there’s a snowballs chance in hell that I win, I would put some of that money towards a Leica Noctilux-m 50mm f/.95 lens. My brother tends to disagree on how good Leica is. He says they are a bunch of hype and I should know better but Leica isn’t just a Red Dot brand for rich yuppies, it is one of the oldest and most respected companies in the history of photography. I’ve done the research, frequented enough technical forums, and have always been impressed with the quality images that come from Leica users . So I plan on getting one someday. Until then, I’m stuck shooting the poor-man’s Leicas: My trusty Olympus E-P2 and OM-D E-M5.

The dead cow photo above is what I chose to submit, not in hopes of winning, but because it represents my vision. As an artist making an honest assessment, It’s my worldview when shooting Landscape Photography that not everything in nature is pristine. I’m chuckling as I write this because it’s a statement against some of the nature photographers in general that like everything untouched and undisturbed before they can compose a picture. It’s ludicrous when in reality, nothing is unscathed even in the national parks. What’s wrong with airplane trails and power-lines being apart of the intended wilderness? Embrace them. In my humble opinion human-kind is apart of the wild and cannot be removed from it. I wonder how this dead cow would have been rendered using Leica glass? Trust me, German glass is superior!

Of course, you don’t have to believe me. Everyone swears by certain brands but some are simply more endearing that others to use. Leica is my favorite company of choice because their whole system is dedicated to the advanced art of manual focusing and the red dot is simply amazing! I won’t go so far as to claim that only real photographers shoot Leica, but I will say some of the most serious street photographers and world famous photojournalists have used Leica since the early days. It’s a serious tradition. Life is short and you may as well go the whole nine yards! So cheers to my favorite brand.

 

The Cyclic Change

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This is a cottonwood tree below a beautiful cloudscape a few years ago. Image was shot with one of my Panasonic Micro Four Thirds cameras. Later, I edited the raw image in Lightroom and just recently exported it to my iPhone 4S where I ran it through an iPhone app that creates the sepia, grain, dust and scratches.  It’s called Scratchcam! This may be an effect that some people don’t like, but for me it communicates how I feel about my art and the intuition that I share deep inside with my images. I think it’s awesome that digital technology has come such a long way that we can now edit images from an handheld device. I’m having a blast shooting images with my iPhone 4s as well and enjoying the art of what they call, iPhoneography. If these new changes to photography are revolutionizing the way we view and capture the world, then I want to be at the forefront of this photographic rennaisance instead of sitting on the sideline.

iPhoneography: Landscape Photography with Iphone 4s

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Telling a story is simple… Who says you can’t do landscape photography with a mobile phone. Are photographers going to throw their prejudices around!? Don’t misunderstand me but understand my intentions. Most people taking photographs right now are doing so using a cell phone. Why not experiment. Recently, I sold my Micro Four Thirds equipment and will eventually update my camera gear but for now, I’m enjoying shooting images with an iPhone!

Evil Waters, Parowan Valley – Utah

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Parowan stands for Evil Waters according to the Southern Paiute. This is the Little Salt Lake in Parowan Valley of Southwestern Utah. Back in the long ago, it was said that a man-eating monster lived out there. Who knows? This is just what I heard. Every time I venture out across the Parowan Valley, there’s strange things to be found.

Old Horn Silver Mine, Frisco Ghost Town – Utah

Frisco, Ghost Town, Utah

Old Horn Silver Mine in the San Francisco Mountains west of Milford, Utah. Below the mine here is the historic mining camp of Frisco, Utah. Back in the 19th century, Utah wasn’t much different than other western states like Nevada and Arizona. It had it’s fair share of wild mining camps, outlaws, gunslingers, prostitutes & saloons. You name it, Utah had it. Frisco was a dangerous town with the reputation of being a widow-maker. More information on this town can be found here: http://www.ghosttowns.com/states/ut/frisco.html

Juniper Tree in Monument Valley Tribal Park, Navajo Nation

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I can take these photos of any landscape you throw at me. This website is my portfolio and I thank Heavenly Father for this privilege to be an artist and take beautiful landscape photos of Mother Earth. If you like my work, please send people to my site. Let people know about my work. I’d like to survive financially doing what I love. It’s not easy being an artist but I want to create beauty and want to work in this field. So any and all support is appreciated. Thanks to my friends who come to this site and other places to let me know what they’re thinking.

Landscape Arch Near Moab Utah

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Everyone should get out at least once in their lifetime to see this grand arch before it collapses and is gone forever. It still looks like a miracle to me, the fact that it’s still standing. There is beauty in this world. Even though it’s all scientifically explorable, the heart of spirit still rules these wild places where wind still talks and the raven planes the edges of Navajo sandstone in search of his next find.

The Midnight Sun

The midnight sun shines in late afternoon across the cottonwood laced savannah land and high desert of Southern Utah. Early spring is trickling in and ushering in the warmer season when the trees will start to get some green on them. There is beauty in my world, and in my life. The land is apart of me, and I am apart of it. We are inseparable!

Portrait of a Dead Pinion Pine Nut Tree

Portrait of a Dead Pinion Pine Nut Tree
These juniper and pinion monuments dot the Escalante Grand Staircase, serving as markers that predate the arrival of Europeans in the Desert Southwest. The trees probably were alive when the Anasazi (Puebloan Ancestors) were still gathering pine nuts from their branches in the year A.D. 900? Now the dead branches slice the desert wind as time moves forward and I can just see them gathering nuts, knapping on flint, and hunting rabbits…

An Old Fridge

An Old Fridge
I found this awesome fridge caked in rust out in the desert near Utah/Nevada state line. The rust is absolutely beautiful. The best part of this photo is that the sage brush surrounds the fridge and who knows how long it’s been sitting there? When did someone dump it out here? Is the person that discarded still around? Who knows? I see the foot-prints of our civilization on the edge of time and it reminds me how short life is and how quickly it passes by.