Ears of Corn in the Hogan

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Corn is an important staple and somewhat of a backbone for the Navajo People. It’s considered to play an important role to the creation of humanity and is apart of the origin of the Navajo people who call themselves the Dineh people. This corn was photographed in a traditional Navajo Home (hogan) with permission.

Juniper Tree in Monument Valley Tribal Park, Navajo Nation

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I can take these photos of any landscape you throw at me. This website is my portfolio and I thank Heavenly Father for this privilege to be an artist and take beautiful landscape photos of Mother Earth. If you like my work, please send people to my site. Let people know about my work. I’d like to survive financially doing what I love. It’s not easy being an artist but I want to create beauty and want to work in this field. So any and all support is appreciated. Thanks to my friends who come to this site and other places to let me know what they’re thinking.

Juniper Claws – Monument Valley Tribal Park

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I’m thinking I should steering more towards color? I’ve always kinda seen color as being taboo and tried to desaturate my images with all worries surrounding color balance and using proper color space is always a hassle but I’m missing the days of positive slide film and Velvia. Digital is so sweet and I’m ready to take a visit to yesteryear. This is a dead juniper in Monument Valley Tribal Park on the Navajo Reservation near the Four Corners area. It’s starkly beautiful country and it’s probably my favorite place to photograph in the Desert Southwest.

Handheld Shot in Antelope Canyon

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I’m not going to exaggerate the colors you usually see in photographs or other landscapes captured around the Southwest. These colors here are about as natural as I can get them other than the white balance on a digital camera being subjective. I’m not going to go out of my way and add strong color to these images, because it makes them look fake. Instead, I try to mimic the beauty of what I saw with my own eyes. Antelope Canyon is a beautiful place to visit but I need to spend more time in there to capture better images. As a tour guide, I’m always on a tight schedule and it would be fun to kick back and slow things down a bit when I visit these places.

Colorful Curves in Antelope Canyon

I took this shot of Antelope Canyon handheld without the tripod last week while guiding a tour in Northern Arizona. This slot canyon is on the Navajo Reservation about five minutes southeast of Page. I work for about three different tour companies but I also travel to places like these alone. I love teaching people about the land and the importance of these beautiful places. Antelope Canyon is located on the Navajo Reservation and is a valuable source of revenue for Navajo owned and operated tour businesses.

Sculptured Waves in Antelope Canyon

This is some strange light in Antelope Canyon on the Navajo Rez. I didn’t quite know how to balance the color but I upped it a little in Lightroom. Usually you need a decent tripod to shoot a slot canyon but I didn’t have any. So I put the ISO on about 800 and shot everything on that using the GF1. Here’s some wavy contour lines in Antelope Canyon. The light is pretty dramatic.

Richardson's Cash & Pawn, Gallup, New Mexico

Richardson's Cash & Pawn, Gallup, New Mexico
I don’t know whether a company like this is beneficial to Indian people (artisans, weavers, jewelers & such) or is more of an exploiter of Native culture? I’m not accusing them of such, but this isn’t even one of those questionable non-profit organizations “dedicated” to preserving Indian culture. When scrutinizing these companies that capitalize on Indian arts & crafts, you have to wonder just how much they contribute to the greater health of both native and non-native people in New Mexico, Arizona, etc? Maybe their appearance and existence is just the continuation of the same colonialism that subjugated and destroyed indigenous cultures in the wake of westward expansion? The hearsay is that Gallup is one of the most bigoted towns in New Mexico against Indians. The town itself is in close proximity to several native communities…

Old Navajo Couple

Old Navajo Couple
The way of life on the reservation isn’t easy at all. Yesterday, when I left Southern Utah and went down there, I wondered what it meant to see this plastered on an unfinished abandoned house on the Navajo Reservation? It seems like life is tough enough that some dreams never survive. I cannot help but think colonialism is all to blame for all the hardship and oppression that I see in these Indian communities. As an outsider, a non-indigenous person, I can see the heartache but also a strong will to survive and continue…

Wooden Skinwalker Carving

Wooden Skinwalker Carving
A carved representation of a Navajo witch, otherwise known as a skinwalker. These entities have deep roots in Navajo culture and it’s controversial to discuss them. I’ve had a few experiences in my own life; events that can be tied to this darker side of Navajo (Dineh) culture. Because of these experiences, I’ll leave it at that!

Navajo Rugs For Sale

Navajo Rugs For Sale
Navajo rugs on display and for sale at Cameron Trading Post on the Navajo Reservation in Northern Arizona. Cameron Trading Post is a great pit-stop when traveling between Page and Flagstaff, Arizona. Some of the tastiest Navajo fry bread is available in their restaurant.

Canyon de Chelly on the Navajo Reservation

Canyon de Chelly on the Navajo Reservation
“You have noticed that everything an Indian does is in a circle, and that is because the Power of the World always works in circles, and everything tries to be round… The Sky is round, and I have heard that the earth is round like a ball, and so are all the stars. The wind, in its greatest power, whirls. Birds make their nest in circles, for theirs is the same religion as ours…

Even the seasons form a great circle in their changing, and always come back again to where they were. The life of a man is a circle from childhood to childhood, and so it is in everything where power moves.” – Black Elk Oglala Sioux Holy Man, 1863-1950

Nice Indians Behind You!

Nice Indians Behind You!
If you have spent a majority of your time traveling across the Navajo Reservation your bound to have passed by this sign on the way to the South Rim of the Grand Canyon. This is left over from the remnants of an old roadside stand that was called Chief Yellowhorse’s Trading Post. There used to be another sign that proclaimed: “Chief Yellowhorse Loves You!” I don’t see it standing up any more though. Soon, I would like to focus my lens on more of the rural decay found on the reservation because there is beauty in what I see out there. It’s kinda sad, but the emotions should be captured in images. Navajoland is a truly beautiful place!