The Marriage Between Micro Four Thirds & iPhonography

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Okay… I’m being overwhelmed with technological advances in photography from using an iPhone 4s to capture and post-process landscape images to using the iPhone to edit and print my DSLR and mirror less camera shots… Okay! I’m not going to give up my regular camera equipment anytime soon, but the iPhone apps are causing me to fall in love with photography all over again. It’s like a rebirth! So stay tuned. This photoblog is going to undergo a lot of different types of photography. I’m trying to post to Flickr, Instagam, Tumblr, Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest. Not an easy feat. Also, this image was shot on a micro four thirds camera then edited with photoshop CS5 and then further processed with the frame using Lo-Mob on my iPhone 4s. I’m integrating my computer and iPhone using Dropbox. It’s pretty crazy. Photo title: Haunted Hallway -Historic Overland Hotel – Pioche, Nevada.

Original 19th Century Memorabilia

Original 19th Century Memorabilia
This is the old west museum in Pioche, Nevada. The town’s a strange place full of Nevada ghost stories. There’s an old lady in her 80s that used to volunteer at the museum but she had passed away since my last visit to the town, and it was in the museum where she past away while on her shift. If you want to know more facts about Pioche, look through my picture archive, as it is one of my favorite destinations in Southern Nevada.

High Noon At Midnight

High Noon At Midnight
Main Street in Pioche, Nevada at midnight. Pioche was one of the wildest mining camps in the west in the late 1800s. It is said that over 76 people were killed in cold blood and shootouts before anyone died of natural causes. It never gained the notoriety of Tombstone or Dodge City because of how isolated and secluded this part of the country was. They say more people died in the violence that ensued in Pioche than the two other towns combined. There are a variety of ghost stories that locals will tell and I can feel the restlessness of whatever is left and still lurking. The history still lives in the presence. So, I try to capture what I feel through my images. There is an intuition at play in my photography and I hope you can see what I am feeling!