The Cyclic Change

This is a cottonwood tree below a beautiful cloudscape a few years ago. Image was shot with one of my Panasonic Micro Four Thirds cameras. Later, I edited the raw image in Lightroom and just recently exported it to my iPhone 4S where I ran it through an iPhone app that creates the sepia, grain, dust and scratches.  It’s called Scratchcam! This may be an effect that some people don’t like, but for me it communicates how I feel about my art and the intuition that I share deep inside with my images. I think it’s awesome that digital technology has come such a long way that we can now edit images from an handheld device. I’m having a blast shooting images with my iPhone 4s as well and enjoying the art of what they call, iPhoneography. If these new changes to photography are revolutionizing the way we view and capture the world, then I want to be at the forefront of this photographic rennaisance instead of sitting on the sideline.

Old Horn Silver Mine, Frisco Ghost Town – Utah

Old Horn Silver Mine in the San Francisco Mountains west of Milford, Utah. Below the mine here is the historic mining camp of Frisco, Utah. Back in the 19th century, Utah wasn’t much different than other western states like Nevada and Arizona. It had it’s fair share of wild mining camps, outlaws, gunslingers, prostitutes & saloons. You name it, Utah had it. Frisco was a dangerous town with the reputation of being a widow-maker. More information on this town can be found here: http://www.ghosttowns.com/states/ut/frisco.html

Decrepit Old Movie Set – Parowan Valley

This is old movie set out in Parowan Valley and it’s one of the few places that I like to stop and photograph around Iron County, Utah. I could do an old ghost town tour and take people around Southern Utah and Nevada and give them that old Western history of the mine camps, pioneer forts, and all other forms of Southwestern Colonialism.

Mooney Falls in Grand Canyon

Thanks to the Supai people and their land, we have one of the most precious gemstones in all of the Southwest, Mooney Falls. The water cascades over the cliff over 200 feet to the bottom. Havasupai is known for it’s turquoise blue waters but I wanted to emphasize the texture of the travertine in this shot because it’s actually the main focal point with the water fall being a distraction. It’s all about the texture, man!