I Wrote a Poem Instead of Homework!

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I wrote this poem instead of doing CSIS Homework… I feel this is much more healthy for the mind versus watching paint dry! The pic above is me, Nate!

Canyon Country in Summer
by Nathan Cowlishaw

I want to be haunted by Cloud Spirits
and visited by the Mirage People
So that the trees and hills know me
and that the Tree Man will speak to me…

I remember the beauty of the rolling desert
in the deep heat of last summer
Which Led me here
to this deep end of intoxicating dreams and imagery…

And like a random flashback
I remember myself
traveling solo,
traversing the wind-swept dirt paths of Canyon Lands
I simmered and fried in the July hea
tin a vehicle without air conditioning
In a sandstone frying pan

At night, the air cooled
As I reached camp…
At a powerful merging place of the Green and Colorado rivers

I parked my Cherokee…
Pitched my tent and watched The candled sky for hours
Listening to the deepness and darkness
of the two rivers moving.
I could hear the water spirits
and the wild entered my dreams.

Now here I am
looking back
With the fall wind looming.

A Hopi Sunset at Work – For the Ultimate Desert Rat

Captured at work tonight on the iPhone 4S. I’m loving this portability in the camera. Learning the art of having a camera on me on the time since my phone is my camera that is with me all the time. This is what I call a Hopi Sunset when they are this intense. It reminds me of a Hopi story about a young man that always strayed to the edge of the mesa outside his village, wondering about the afterlife and what happened after this life.

Evil Waters, Parowan Valley – Utah

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Parowan stands for Evil Waters according to the Southern Paiute. This is the Little Salt Lake in Parowan Valley of Southwestern Utah. Back in the long ago, it was said that a man-eating monster lived out there. Who knows? This is just what I heard. Every time I venture out across the Parowan Valley, there’s strange things to be found.

Old Car in a Slot Canyon, Escalante-Grand Staircase Ntl. Mon.

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This kinda reminded of Arron Ralston who lost his arm to a boulder in a Bluejohn Canyon out in the remote part of Canyonlands. This right here is a car that been lodged down in this slot canyon since probably the late fifties or sixties… who knows, maybe a massive flash flood wedged it down into there over 30 years ago. The car is now apart of the erosion process, so-to-be-an-artifact!

Juniper Tree in Monument Valley Tribal Park, Navajo Nation

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I can take these photos of any landscape you throw at me. This website is my portfolio and I thank Heavenly Father for this privilege to be an artist and take beautiful landscape photos of Mother Earth. If you like my work, please send people to my site. Let people know about my work. I’d like to survive financially doing what I love. It’s not easy being an artist but I want to create beauty and want to work in this field. So any and all support is appreciated. Thanks to my friends who come to this site and other places to let me know what they’re thinking.

Barrier Style Pictographs – Hanksville Region, Utah

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These pictographs are unknown to the general public and it is my policy not to disclose location information of these sacred and sensitive sites. I feel it is important to share the beauty though, so people can see what some of these sites look like. Please do not ask me for location information because I will not tell you. These pictographs are believed to be around 5,000-8,000 years old and were left by the Western Archaic hunters & gatherers whom predate ancient Puebloan (Anasazi) peoples.

Juniper Claws – Monument Valley Tribal Park

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I’m thinking I should steering more towards color? I’ve always kinda seen color as being taboo and tried to desaturate my images with all worries surrounding color balance and using proper color space is always a hassle but I’m missing the days of positive slide film and Velvia. Digital is so sweet and I’m ready to take a visit to yesteryear. This is a dead juniper in Monument Valley Tribal Park on the Navajo Reservation near the Four Corners area. It’s starkly beautiful country and it’s probably my favorite place to photograph in the Desert Southwest.

Sands Motel – Saint George, Utah

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Sands Motel in Saint George is one of the few hotels in Utah that really has an eerie feel of the Desert Southwest. When I mean by eerie is just secluded, a little rundown, and basically buzzing neon. Nonetheless, this is the rural decay that I love in Americana. This is the basic culture of the modern Southwest. If you think about it, not much has changed but there’s no guarantees that these old fashioned neon signs will be around forever.

The Farmer's Sprinklers

This is funny; it usually takes me a few weeks to figure out the characteristics of a lens to determine if I like it or not. It didn’t take long for me to fall in love with the Micro 4/3 Panasonic Lumix Vario 100-300mm lens. I took a couple dozen more photos similar to this with the same lens and the bokeh isn’t too shabby for a telephoto lens. The out-of-focus areas are really nice and different here and there’s a lot of dimension in this composition. So I think it was a wise choice to invest in this lens. Last week I sold my 45-200mm lens to fund the purchase and I’m happy I did. This lens seems much sharper than it’s little brother and I think the bokeh is noticeably better!

Man Made Ruins Versus High Desert

In this epic battle the ruins will fade away and creep  into time. Here I am alive in the moment and my lens captures the slow eroding action. This is why photography is so powerful and essential at least to an insignificant human like me. There needs to be some type of ability for a soul to express itself and I’m an image-maker. It’s a powerful title as I capture the world with the memories soon will follow.

Shaved Ice

This is the classic rural decay one finds around Southern Utah in towns like Minersville. Most of the buildings are old, decrepit and cracked but I wouldn’t have it any other way. Decay is a beautiful thing to behold. When a town cleans up their buildings and streets it loses the beauty that appeals to my camera lens. Look at all that awesome wear in the building with the white paint peeling away. I love it that there’s only a strip of the original sign laying exposed behind wood paneling on the side of the building. What a piece of history trying to withstand the winds of time!

 

A Bird Fossil in the Making

A Bird Fossil in the Making
Shot this photo of a mummified bird encrusted in the exposed dry lake bed of the Great Salt Lake. The waters seem to be receding exposing all kinds of interesting stuff. I bet, if left untouched, this will become a fossil in another 2-3 million years. It looks like one right now! :)

Vandalized Rail Road Sign

Vandalized Rail Road Sign
It looks like this fell victim to a bunch of hillbilly drunkards late one night. I found it with the base of the sign burned off and the hole where they tore it out of the ground. At the same site there were a few dozen beer bottles kicking around and a fire-pit that was still smoking. All of this was evidence of the redneck booze party. It doesn’t look like there was any poached animal carcasses though. It’s not rare to cross a scene like this and find a few dead mule deer with their antlers sawed off or the head missing. A few individuals in the rural parts of Utah don’t much care for the law, or the spirit of the wild in this regard. I can have pity on some father shooting a doe to feed his family, but when someone is killing dear for the sake of removing the antlers, that’s just cold-blooded!